Well, I can’t even remember when I’ve learnt to knit, but I really put my thought into it and started taking it seriously in 2010. What keeps you going when you start and struggle whit something totally new? Isabel from FrivolousGirl is sharing her experience with knits:

Another aspect of creating your own clothing is that you get a whole different respect at what’s put into making a garment, as well as contributing to a more slow fashion to form. I come from a place of green thinking, and what originally drew me to making my own clothing was the sustainability-aspects of it. But knitting doesn’t automatically make you an environmentalist, I see far too many knitters who focuses more about quality, form and composition than caring of where their yarn actually comes from. The knitting industry isn’t better than buying sweatshop clothing, we instead replace humans to animals, and I think many don’t think about this connection. This is something we should have in mind.
…I tend to lean towards working more with cotton, bamboo, linen and modal.

There’s definitely a complexity being vegan and engaging in an industry that exploits animals for own gain. At this time I’m still deciding whether it is or could be an ethical practice, as I’m not quick to gather all businesses in one sack. Instead, I tend to lean towards working more with cotton, bamboo, linen and modal. Although I may dabble in some animal fibers, however, I make sure it comes from suppliers that don’t practice mulesing, as well as working with Alpaca wool instead, which ironically would be cruel not to shave in the summer.

Then there’s the cotton-issue, where the majority is grown with toxic chemicals. Luckily, organic cotton yarn has been popping up more lately with addition of organic wool also. Acrylic fiber is something that many vegans tend to suggest using instead of wool, but as from an environmentalist point of view, plastic fibers made from the oil industry isn’t optimal either.
I think the first step would be to lower the demand, buy consciously, create your own more, and raise your voice on sustainable fibers to be used and made instead.

In other words, there’re many things that are wrong in the clothing industry overall, whether you make your own or buy the factory made clothing. But I think the first step would be to lower the demand, buy consciously, create your own more, and raise your voice on sustainable fibers to be used and made instead.

I don’t think it’s an coincidence I and so many others lean towards making our own clothing, as it makes us feel more in control, much closer to our clothing and at the same time it raises a few inner questions we have about sustainability.
When you’re tired of a that top you made, you can always frog it and make something new 🙂